UNDERSTANDING BRAIN TUMOURS

A brain tumour is a collection of damaged cells that multiply out of control within the brain. Also called a neoplasm, growth, mass or lesion. A brain tumour is classified as either primary or secondary (metastatic) and can be benign or malignant.

Primary brain tumours develop in - and generally remain in - the brain. Secondary brain tumours, or metastatic brain tumours, are cancers that develop elsewhere in the body and spread to the brain. The most common cancers that spread to the brain are lung and breast cancers.

The Government’s lack of funding for brain tumour research is absolutely shocking; brain tumour research actually receives just 0.7% of the national Cancer Research fund but even more shocking is the fact that this statistic is virtually unknown.
THIS HAS TO CHANGE!

30 BRAIN TUMOURS DIAGNOSED EVERY DAY
SINGLE BIGGEST CANCER KILLER OF CHILDREN
OVER ONE THIRD OF CANCERS SPREAD TO THE BRAIN
LESS THAN 15% SURVIVAL RATE WHICH HAS NOT CHANGED SINCE THE 1970's
THERE ARE 120 TYPES OF BRAIN TUMOUR
NOTORIOUSLY DIFFICULT TO DIAGNOSE AND CAN CAUSE MASSIVE PERSONALITY CHANGES
We intend to leave no stone unturned in our determination to plough much needed funds into brain tumour research; please, please help us at The PPR Foundation to make this happen by making a donation to us, no matter how small. Your donation will really help to make a difference!
Help us to win the fight against brain tumours
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